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Flawed redemption still a happy anniversary

 

Screenshot from 'The Day of the Doctor', Doctor Who copyright 2013 BBC

It was 1978 or 1979. I was in grade 8 and quite liked my home-room teacher. Mr. Pritchard also liked me, the bright, nerdly kid who had made the school's "newspaper" his own, contributing articles, editorials, cartoons — and (yes) even reviews.

One afternoon after class, as I watched over the Gestetner machine chunking out its blue mimeo pages and Mr. Pritchard watched over me, I mentioned I was looking forward to Saturday, when another episode of Doctor Who, this British television program I'd recently discovered, was going to be broadcast, right before the hockey game.

Mr. Pritchard looked up and laughed, his moustache bristling his delight. "Really!" he said, "Is that still on the air? I used to watch it when I was your age!" He was probably about 30 then, meaning I had barely been born when he was my age!

Learning of that long continuity delighted me as much as — and maybe more than — it did Mr. Pritchard. And now that 15 years of the program's history has become 50, and my personal continuity with it is twice what my teacher's was, the fact that Doctor Who is still on the air delights me even more.

All of which makes me doubly-pleased that the program's 50th anniversary episode, "The Day of the Doctor", exceeded my (admittedly, low) expectations by a wide margin. While not without some significant flaws, Steven Moffat's long-awaited 2013 series finale (of sorts; the upcoming Christmas special will probably mark the real series end, as well as the transition to the next) was a well-crafted entertainment, that balanced humour, drama and nostalgia and, even, pathos, without getting bogged down by the Enormous Anniversariness of it all.

Though some nonsensical elements demonstrated yet again Moffat's tendency to confuse plot with story and maguffin with plot, structurally, "The Day of the Doctor" was a happy anniversary present for this jaded and weary viewer.

Certainly it was the most entertaining multi-Doctor special to come down the pike since, well, forever. I really did laugh and I really did cry, on both first and second viewings — and it's been quite a while since a Moffat-scripted episode of Doctor Who hit me like that.

As usual, my full review is liberal with spoilers. And yes, I spend quite a lot of time exploring those "significant flaws". If you don't want your pleasure challenged, I recommend staying away; if you want in read on click here for The Day of the Doctor: The Bad, the Good, and the Meta.

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The Night Before the Day of the Doctor

Resurgence of hope?

Screenshot from Doctor Who mini episode, Night of the Doctor, Doctor Who copyright 2013 BBC

Doctor Who returns tomorrow, in yet another special, this one to be simulcast all over the world, the better to prevent the spilling of spoilers before their time.

Do I sound cynical? Those (few) of you who have been wondering what happened to my long-promised review of "The Name of The Doctor", first broadcast last spring, might well expect me to be.

I won't disappoint you: I still am.

But I ran across a bit of a surprise a couple of nights back, in the form of an eight-minute (mini) episode called "The Night of the Doctor." I don't suppose many of you reading this are still in the dark about it, but just in case, I'll offer no details here. Beware the spoilers that lurk in my review!

The surprising pleasure I received from the above-noted short film, saw my cynicism tempered, a little, by hope that this Saturday's long-awaited extravaganza might also surprise me. That hope saw me finally re-visit last spring's ostensible finale, "The Name of the Doctor" — and, yes, to also finally review it. That review is behind this cut. Spoilers, of course, and also a return to much wailing and gnashing of critical teeth. You've been warned on both counts.

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[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Eleven: One

(Secondary prompt: Multi-Doctors)


The Two-tastic Round Ten is still in progress, but as the 50th Anniversary looms ever larger we haven't got a moment to lose in getting ready for the next in [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons. This month's Doctor is One, the mysterious old wizard with the cabinet of wonders who came walking out of the fog that fateful night in 1963, whisking a pair of unsuspecting schoolteachers out of the world they knew and away into space and time. And fittingly for the anniversary month itself, our secondary theme this time is Multi-Doctors - what better way to celebrate the anniversary than with a bit of self-indulgent, only occasionally sense-making, probably ill-advised multi-Doctor team-up action? If Doctor Who fanwork is of any interest to you, at all, I urge you once again to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm and, if you want to, express your interest in taking part:

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
Just a reminder that it's still just about not too late to register your interest in taking part in the next round of the [community profile] who_at_50 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon:

Round Ten: Two

(Secondary prompt: The TARDIS)


If you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork of whatever form, take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to announce your intention to take part!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!


jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Ten: Two

(Secondary prompt: The TARDIS)


The Three-themed Round Nine is still in motion, but as we hurtle into the final stages of [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons and the 50th anniversary comes ever closer, there's not a moment to waste in getting on with the next leg. This month's Doctor is Two, the clownish cosmic hobo with some serious hidden depths; the Doctor's first turn at being a classic trickster figure, with all that that implies. And also with some of the most iconic companions in the original series' run, including the one and only Jamie. And our secondary theme this time round is based around the most important character in the programme's history never to get a line of dialogue (until Neil Gaiman came along, that is); that's right, the TARDIS. I don't think our 'thon would be a true reflection of the series' half-century if we didn't find room for some blue box love. If Doctor Who fanwork is your thing, at all, I urge you once again to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm and, if you want to, express your interest in taking part:

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Nine: Three

(Secondary prompt: Who Spinoffs)


The Four-centred eighth round is on-going, but already signups have begun for the next in [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons counting down to the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. I hope this month's themes will pique your creative interests. The dashing, be-frilled, hard-driving and hard-karate-ing Three is this month's Doctor, as well as everything his presence implies; Jo, Liz, Sarah Jane, the UNIT gang and the Master. And, to keep things that bit more interesting, our secondary theme centres upon Doctor Who's various fully-fledged spinoff series. While that includes the obvious suspects in the form of Torchwood and the Sarah Jane Adventures, it could also take in curiosities like "K9 and Company" or the proposed Rose Tyler spinoff that never was, or indeed the various spinoff series we've seen in other media such at the audios. If you like Doctor Who fanwork even a little bit, I urge you once again to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm and, if you so desire, express your interest in taking part:

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
Just a reminder that it's still just about not too late to register your interest in taking part in the next round of the [community profile] who_at_50 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon:

Round Eight: Four

(Secondary prompt: The Companions)


If you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork of whatever form, take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to announce your intention to take part!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Eight: Four

(Secondary prompt: The Companions)


The Five-centric seventh round continues, but already signups have begun for the next in [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons counting down to the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. I hope this month's themes will generate a lot of interest and creativity. The legendary Four is this month's Doctor, and he really needs no introductions; the scarf, the teeth, the curls, the arms, the legs, the everything. And, inevitable as it was that we would get to them sooner or later, our secondary theme centres upon the companions, or assistants if you prefer; all of those special people who have shared the Doctor's travels with him over the years; we all have our favourites, don't we? Although I like to think the Doctor loves them all equally, if differently. If you like Doctor Who fanwork even a little bit, I urge you to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm and, if you so desire, express your interest in taking part:

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
Just a reminder that it's still not (quite) too late to express your interest in taking part in the next round of the [community profile] who_at_50 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon:

Round Seven: Five

(Secondary prompt: "Minor" Characters)


If you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork of whatever form, take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to announce your intention to take part!

The Livejournal Version

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Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
juliet316: (DW: 11 - The Doctor Dances)
[personal profile] juliet316
Spoilers for S7! Especially spoilers for the S7 finale! Click at your own risk!


30 icons of the Eleventh Doctor Here
24 icons of S7 here.



Teasers:

 photo Chara20n20Rd46AC3_zps8df467a3.png photo Season20in20Rd33Cat1_zps369312d5.png photo Season20in20Rd33AC2_zps149046f4.png
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Seven: Five

(Secondary prompt: "Minor" Characters)


The Six-themed sixth round continues, but already signups have begun for the next in [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons counting down to the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. Five is the Doctor we're looking at this month, the boyish cricketer who thought there ought to be another, better way, but was continually reminded by the uncaring early-80s universe that there wasn't, really. And in homage to the legendary who_like_giants ficathons of years past, our secondary theme is "minor" characters; all of those one-off heroes and villains, aliens and ordinary folk, who the Doctor has crossed paths (and occasionally swords) with over the years, some of them becoming fan-favourites in their own right. If you like Doctor Who fanwork even a little bit, I urge you to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if you so desire, indicate your interest in taking part:

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
Just a reminder that it's still not too late to express your interest in taking part in the upcoming next round of the [community profile] who_at_50 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon:

Round Six: Six

(Secondary prompt: The Time Lords)


If you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork of whatever form, take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to announce your intention to take part!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Six: Six

(Secondary prompt: The Time Lords)


The fifth round is still in progress, but already signups have begun for the sixth in [community profile] who_at_50's series of monthly fanwork-a-thons counting down to the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. Six is the Doctor under consideration this month; orator, actor, bon viveur, trendsetter... And in light of the fact that they put him on trial for his existence, it seemed apt for June's secondary prompt to examine the Time Lords, in all of their heroic, villainous, godlike, ineffectual, indifferent, meddling glory, all ten million years of it. If you have any interest at all in Doctor Who fanwork, I urge you to take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to reply to them!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
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[personal profile] ed_rex

Nightmare In Tedium

Neil Gaiman channels Stephen Thompson

(Which is never a good thing)

Screenshot from 'Nightmare in Silver', Doctor Who copyright 2013 BBC

On more than one occasion, the writer Harlan Ellsion insisted his name be removed from a movie or television program and replaced with that of Cordwainer Bird in place of his own. He did it when he believed his script had been butchered: changed to the point where the on-screen result would in some way make him look bad. It was his way of "flipping the bird" at those who had ruined his work and, more, of protecting his own reputation as a screen-writer.

If Neil Gaiman doesn't have a pseudonym for similar circumstances, he should get one — and apply it retroactively to his sophomore entry as a screen-writer for Doctor Who.

"Nightmare in Silver" isn't the worst episode of this year's often-dreadful half-series (far from it) but it isn't very good, either.

It is almost inconceivable that the the writer of "The Doctor's Wife" (not to mention of the Sandman graphic novels) could have handed in a script as dramatically disjointed, as illogical and as frankly boring, as that which showed up on our television screens this past weekend. And surely, it wasn't Neil Gaiman who closed the episode with the appalling spectacle of the Doctor almost literally drooling as he ponders the sight of Clara in a skirt just "a little bit too tight".

A nightmare in silver? More like pewter, or even tin. Spoilers and snark, as usual.

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[personal profile] ed_rex

Patterns of abuse

Screenshot from, The Crimson Horror, Doctor Who copyright 2013 BBC

I know a lot of you enjoyed "The Crimson Horror" and, in comparison to the previous week's travesty, you had every right to.

Nevertheless, what you enjoyed was still pretty lousy television and I guarantee that, unless you make a real study of it, you won't remember a damned thing about it a year from now.

Don't believe me?

Read "Carry On Up the Tardis!" to find out why it was the idea of "The Crimson Horror" you liked, and not the show itself.

As usual, both plot- and fun-spoilers abound, so enter at your own risk.

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[personal profile] ed_rex

The contempt of the show-runner

The Hisotry of the Time War, screenshot, copyright BBC

An insult. A slap in the face. Or should I say, another insult, another slap in the face?

What more is there to say? The whole of Steven Moffat's Doctor Who has been a long series of insults dressed up as Big Ideas, punctuated by apologies from the likes of Richard Curtis and Neil Gaiman.

But how long can we point to "Vincent and the Doctor" or "The Doctor's Wife" and tell ourselves that Steven Moffat actually cares about the cultural institution in his charge?

The truth is, we have become so used to terrible television that when the merely mediocre happens along, people like me nearly start preaching the second coming.

It's time we face the truth: Steven Moffat holds us, his audience, in utter contempt. Take as Exhibit 37, the latest mess of a program broadcast under the name of Doctor Who.

"Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS" begins with an implausible and arbitrary set-up and is propelled by a plot that works only through the unlikely stupidity of its guest characters, the even more unlikely (and dumb) decisions of its regulars and a resolution that re-uses — yet again! — one of Moffat's now tired and tiresome time-travel tropes — and which then cheats on its own rules. The BBC brain-trust ought to be ashamed to have allowed it to air.

My full review is behind this link, but be warned: I am not happy and sometimes I say so in language unfit for ears of the young and tender, or for eyes of work-mates reading over one's shoulder. Also, there are spoilers, as per normal.

Finally, if you want to suggest that I hate this show so much I shouldn't be reviewing it, you may be right. But I committed myself to seeing Series 7 through to the end, and so I will. But after that? If Steven Moffat is still in charge, I rather suspect I'll be done with the show for the duration. Those of you as sick of my opinions as I am sick of Steven Moffat's stories probably have more reason for hope than I do.

jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
Just a reminder, it's still (just about!) not too late to express your interest in taking part in the upcoming next round of the [community profile] who_at_50 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon:

Round Five: Seven

(Secondary prompt: The "Expanded Universe")


If you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork of whatever form, take the time to look at the signup posts on the comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to announce your intention to take part!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
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[personal profile] ed_rex

Of ghosts, of monsters, of hockey teams

A fan's faith, reborn

Les bleus, blancs et rouges, Habs logo.
Boo! Screenshot, Doctor Who: Hide

April 22, 2013, OTTAWA — I grew up during the 1970s and was a fan of the Montreal Canadiens (a professional (ice) hockey team, the only sport that really matters in Canada). The 1970s was a good decade to cheer for the "Habs"; les glorieux won the Stanley Cup in 10 of the first 14 years of my life.

Since then, they have drunk from that sacred Cup but twice, a bitter drought for those loyal followers who yet wave the bleu, blanc et rouge and who, each autumn, dream again the following spring will see a return to glory at last.

Saturday's episode of Doctor Who, "Hide", felt almost like I had (yes) been transported back in time and in space, to the Montreal Forum on the evening of May 21, 1979, to witness my team's 4th Stanley Cup victory in a row.

Doctor Who: Hide promo poster.

All right, I exaggerate. One episode does not a championship make. And maybe the metaphor doesn't entirely make sense. But neither, often, does logic in Doctor Who. So (as an American might say), sue me.

The conceit feels right to me — and besides, when was the last time someone discussed hockey and Doctor Who in the same place?

Point is, for this fan, the last few years following the Doctor has felt a lot like watching the Montreal Canadiens lose hockey games. The uniforms look more or less the same, and there's still a lot of travel involved, but victories are few and far between.

"Hide" was one of those victories. And a victory so convincing, this fan suddenly feels those naive hopes of a championship springing like wheat from an arid field. Click here to find out why. Far fewer spoilers than usual.

jjpor: (Who@50)
[personal profile] jjpor
50th Anniversary Fanwork-a-thon-a-thon, Round Five: Seven

(Secondary prompt: The "Expanded Universe")


Even as the fourth round continues, already it's time to sign up for the fifth in our series of monthly fanwork-a-thons counting down to the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. It's Seven this month, the very last of the classic series Doctors; sad clown, wise old magician, formidable weaver of plots. And appropriately considering Seven's lengthy post-TV career in novels and audios, May's secondary prompt considers Who's equivalent of what Star Wars is pleased to call its Expanded Universe - all of the characters and story-arcs from media other than television, that is the novels, comics and audios that have come to take on a life and form canons of their own in the years since 1989. Please, if you have an interest in Doctor Who fanwork, take the time to look at the signup posts on the [community profile] who_at_50 comm...and if it takes your fancy be sure to sign up!

The Livejournal Version

The Dreamwidth Version

Remember - all fanworks of whatever form are more than welcome!
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[personal profile] ed_rex

"The Cold War" weds mediocrity with subtle brilliance

Jenna-Louise Coleman becoming a revelation

Jenna-Louise Coleman as Clara, screenshot detail.

April 19, 2013, OTTAWA — Late again, I know. Life and an episode of back-aches has kept me busy.

And more, I found it hard to find my focus on this episode. An entertaining tale on the surface, dig just a little bit and you find in the Mark Gatiss-penned "The Cold War" only another stop on Steven Moffat's Travelling Medicine Show of Intellectual Horrors.

An idiot plot, in other words.

But there was an upside, beyond the mere fact this episode made for the second in a row that managed at least to be an entertaining distraction on first viewing. That is, that Jenna-Louise Coleman is starting to look like the best regular actor to grace this series since maybe as far back as Christopher Eccleson's turn as the Ninth Doctor, and certainly since Catherine Tate played Donna Noble.

I know, I know, it's early days, and so I stand to be corrected, but so far Coleman is doing remarkable things with often ludicrous material. "Click here to read more, and to watch a video aide. Spoilers, as always. Links to my Series 7 reviews can be found at Edifice Rex Online.

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